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that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little bit slow. we had this conversation 10 years ago. now, i will stick my neck out and say for a variety of reasons, some of which are circumstantial, some of which have to do with the leadership in the standing committee come i believe that this topic will have to become an a more important topic. and that wi
donkey, or lack thereof. i love the picture. it reminded me of a priceless letter he sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american
, usually you can. the law has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that if at all in the criminal justice system? to dat
qualified -- that is the point i wanted to make more globally. the problem is the state law definition of "candidate." we can add this section in local law, which is fine and whatever version ends up tonight or thereafter will work for the moment. but i think we should urge the state legislature to include an appointed office-holder, because that was the route of this to begin with. >> that we definitely can't do tonight? >> no, it's not on the calendar, but something that we could contemplate in future and i would suspect there is support for that. >> do you have other comments about what we can do here and now? >> sorry. thank you for bringing me back. i agree that the language in lines 19 and 20 are somewhat problematic. i don't know that they work into line 16-18. i think they really only apply in subsection b. i mean it's difficult to read 16-18 and imports 19 and 20 in, that the "order to support" language. it just gets a little circular, but i do agree that support should include actions or statements whether public or non-public. that are trying to urge or encourage a part
a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront, but have the opportunity to participate -- and we have cards that you could fill out and questions. this promises to be a year of reform and change like we have never seen, and we now see prisoner reentry programs being implemented. we're still spending too much money and resources and not enough on rehabilitation and reentry. this november, the voters will decide on limiting the three strikes law. issues and measures long overdue. it is clear there is much more that needs to be done. according to a study that was published this month -- since 1989, 2000 people have been wrongfully incarcerated and they served collectively, 10,000 years. an average of 11 years person. i would like to thank the people who made this summit possible. memoranda -- amy devon -- many volunteers and all of our speakers and panelists. i would like to thank the co- sponsors, and the bar association of san francisco. i would like to thank them for their hel
, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that for a lot of people it does have to be a
. what can we do? for one, the ammunition that has been designed especially by law enforcement for military use has no reason to be in our homes and on our streets. and, so, we are introducing legislation focused on what has been labeled to be the hollow point bullets, but there are other types of bullets that are designed for more massive destruction of the human body that should only be in the hands of law enforcement and the military, and not in the civilian hands at all. and we want to ban them from possession in our city of san francisco. so, we're introducing legislation aimed at that kind of ballistics ammunition and banning them from possession in our city. the second piece of legislation is we believe that any person who purchases more than 500 rounds of any type of ammunition, notice should go to our police chief so that we have time to investigate as to reasons why that purchase should be made and understand who is making it. so, we are introducing a second piece of legislation about notification to our police chief of any of that kind of high level of purchase. thes
. foreigners sneak into america and take american jobs, there ought to be a law, government ought to do something. that's just the way pple think, it's instinct. i have to admit how i used to think, took me decades to realize i was wrong, passing a law often does more harm than good. and progress comes from millions of individuals acting to make themselves better off guided by an invisible hand that inadvertently helps others. not to viewers of the "stossel" show, but to normal people. when there is a problem, government should address it. my next guest says they know what our brain is wired that way. an evolutionary psychiatrist at the university of california santa barbara and the author of the mind of the market. so, there is your book, let me start with you since you talk about the mind. you say the faith in government comes from evolution and? >> the natural propensity we have is if people have more stuff than somebody else, there must have been something else done wrong, something immoral, something unfair because in the small band of hunter and gatherer in very resource poor envi
of facts and conclusions of law. and so i was just wondering what was exactly contemplated by that? is that something written or just orally? when the vote is taken? it's sort of a companion question to commissioner renne's point and then i see later in section e, under "orders," it says, "the commission will instruct staff to prepare written order reflecting the commission's findings." so then i was wondering if what was contemplated was the findings of fact and conclusions of law to be incorporated in that order, which we would instruct, based on our vote and finding, verbally. or is there a more extensive process that is contemplated with respect to preparing findings of fact and conclusions of law? >> i think they just contemplated the commission doing it during the hearing. >> okay. >> that was my understanding as well and certainly if it was a complicated issue where we wanted to make written findings and that the summary order was more involved, i think we could do more. but i think the idea is that we can hopefully make them orally to get to resolution quickly. >> yes
care law was so unpopular when the president signed it into law and it remains absolutely that two years later. apparently nancy pelosi was right about the obamacare program, at least when she uttered these now infamous words, calling for passage of the legislation. >> we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it. away from the father of the controversy. lou: is getting rid of obamacare so one option for republicans? we will talk with legal analyst peter johnson on the way forward. also, the worsening political crisis in egypt. splitting egypt between those who want the islamic state, governed by sharia law, and those who oppose it. andrew boston this year. the professor and the author of the new book "sharia versus freedom." in the nation's credit rating is at risk. serious proposals to reduce the deficit and really end our national debt. potentially, a significant blow to the obamacare controversial o contraceptive mandate. the eighth circuit court of appeals in the preliminary injunction to stop the mandate for being enforced against the missouri catholic busi
joe leiberman observed on cnn that passing new gun laws won't be easy. >> the strength of the nra that more than half of the abuts in america have guns, own guns, have them in their homes. >> brown: they already may be having affect, gun store owners around the country have reported their stock is flying off the shelves. >> we have christmas business, hunting season business now we have the political business. >> brown: back in newtown the focus remained on coping with a christmas ravaged by grief. local post office received a flood of cards with messages of hope and towns people expect to light hundreds of outdoor candles tonight for the 26 shooting victims. >> ifill: still to come on the newshour, egypt's troubled referendum; medical marijuana runs into federal law; special elections coming to the senate; helping haiti's orphans; and hundred years of "poetry" magazine. but first, with the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the christmas of 2012 began arriving around the world this evening. in bethlehem, manger square was adorned in decorations and lights, a
in our city. to support the police department and law enforcement system of doing more predictive policing using both data and technology to help us do that. and then, of course, i think the most important part is to organize our communities and work with community-based organizations, families, religious groups, and everybody that's on the ground to find more ways to intervene in violent behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it
-of-state law and stat law has pro vision visions like this that took effect this year and we hope that will make a difference for local sub contractors. >>> supervisor wiener?. >> supervisor cohen? thank you. i do have one item today in in memoryium, i ask that the board close out the meeting in memory of mr. bradford he was the first african america meal after the san francisco sheriff's department and he was born in blight california and came to san francisco in 1955 he seived regularly in the united states army and korean war and is the father of three children two sons and one dear and i send my condole lenses out to his family he was one of my sunday schoolteachers growing up and brang donuts holes to class and making the subject matter very interesting and enjoyable and i grew up with his grandchildren and it's a great loss that san francisco has suffered in losing mr. bradford and so iggs again colleagues i hope to close out the board in his memory and this is the memory of mr. bradford. >> thank you ms. cohen. mr. chu. >>? mr. campos, thank you mr. clerk i hav
in line behind the people who have been lawful and waited in line. so we don't give them a preference in line but we do give them a legal status and we don't prohibit them from getting in line if they choose to go the citizenship route. gerri: senator, what do you have to have to be able to be part of the program as you're defining it? >> you have to be under 14 when you came here and you have to be under 28 now. you can serve four years in the military or, you can have six years in which to get some kind of job training or degree. it can be college degree of course or a technical degree, vocational degree, something that gives you a skill and then, from that point you would get al second visa that would allow you to work for four years and then have the ability to stay here as long as you want to and abide by the law. gerri: i want to ask you why it is important to have this legislation. one of the issues of course in the wake of the elections, a lot of critics of republicans said, the republican party in particular need to be more supportive of immigrants, have some kind of path to
the lawful property of southern families, namely their slaves. and there was no compromise that could erase those tensions. they had been trying to compromise the issue of slavery for three generations. they compromised over slavery when they wrote the constitution. they compromised over slavery when they passed the northwest -- opening the upper midwest. they compromised over slavery in 1820 with the famous missouri compromise. they compromised over slavery in 1850 with the fugitive slave act and in 1854 with the kansas/nebraska act. the dred scott opinion of the supreme court was supposed to be compromised, resolving the issue of slavery. they had tried and tried and tried to compromise. it had not worked and that is why the crisis came. if one nation sharing the same congress, operating under the same laws, could not compromise the issue, how could two nations side-by-side, sharing these vital arteries of commerce and communication, how could they hope to resolve the issue? and what's more, lincoln understood that if secession managed one success there would not be illogical into it. we
under current law. but i think the commission agreed that the raising and spending of that size of money was not designed by the voters to be something that went unregulated. so the commission directed the staff to put together some provisions that would, as i said, regulate committed are designed to draft, particularly those that raise tangible sums of money. the reason for that is that a citywide campaign aimed at a single person still reaches people citywide, and would conceivably impact their decisions at the polling place based on the fact that you get someone to run for office by extolling their virtues. so these rectally simple to follow will treat under our law, such campaigns, such committees, excuse me, as primarily formed campaigns and therefore, report their activities to the voters. >> they are divided into two diction points. does the commissioners have any questions with regards to decision point 1? i have a question and it has to do with our definition of "support." i have some concern that it's maybe a little too restrictive, because i could imagine someone simply s
laws and regular blagses that basket all small business and is make recommend dayses and consolidation. you committed that this report will be completed by june of this year and as of today no nothing has been done to consolid date this and mr. mayor, i look forward to continuing to work with your administration on a wide variety of efforts to assist or small businesses can you recommit to carrying out this mandate of prop i and when will this be forth coming. >>> thank you for your question and the opportunity to provide and you the full board with an up date and i know how serious you are about ensuring the small business and is stream lining the action with the city. because businesses don't care whether it's a d ph, t rx or h s b, we are all one big hurdle to come and as part of my plan i made technology to cut through base businesses a top priority for me the work is well under way supervisor and it's important that it get done in a way that it's thorough and leads to improvement for at this's small business and is that will take time because we know that the plan is more impor
in program that would violate state law, and i assume that we have looked at what the limits are that the law imposes on us. would you elaborate a little bit how what we're doing has been shaped to fit within the state law or on the other hand where is there jeopardy for us? >> so the notification and education program survey and early notification portions are the sort of the new pieces that aren't required by state law. we are using those outreach efforts, those outreach components to inform who we talk to in the actual statutory opt out phase. we are not suggesting that anyone who is going to be served by cleanpower sf would not receive an opt out notification. anyone who wishes to participate can participate which sounds like opting in, but we won't enroll them after we have included them in an opt out process. so i think we have worked with the city attorney on this to make sure we are accurately understanding our obligation and that our approach is consistent with it. we think it is. and so we're not always this careful with our language as we should be, but the actual steps will b
. they make laws that we have to follow. it gives me great pleasure to introduce the president of the board of supervisors, david chiu. [applause] >> good afternoon. first, if any of you have ever wondered what an ls -- and elected officials sounds like with anesthesia and his mouth, i want to let you know that i got out of a dental chair 20 minutes ago after a few hours of dentists work. but i wanted to give a few remarks of how i think we are doing. i'm very much more are optimistic about how we're doing than four years ago. i read an article from the chronicle and it said that the candidates disagreed on everything, except for the need to crack down on entertainment violence. i did not propose anything for the first six months until there were half a dozen people affected. that was followed by a terrific shooting, which was then followed by an incident in union square. i want to take a moment and thank the san francisco police department for your input. if we pass legislation to require additional security requirements and plans. we pass legislation to give the entertainment commission m
to them should the modifications be declined. some of these laws on the books a little archaic, and i will give you an example. we now have live entertainment in san francisco, which allows amplified music until 10:00 p.m. if the conditions has no entertainment, and the entertainment, it also includes this limited live provision. we have determined in the city that this legislation is good -- good legislation. there's no conditional use requirement to have this. a lot of people today want to have food, drink, and be able to have some music. how can we get the limited live entertainment excluded from the know amplified or no live entertainment excluded on the transfers? >> that is going to mostly driven locally. most of the conditions you'll ever see on an abc license are because we rely, to a great extent, on the police department and local officials to determine what is best for their communities. i'm not trying to pin this on you guys or blame you guys, but we do try to work with you. we do not tend to want to overrule the police department very often. now that said, i get a fair nu
this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but definitely, we need to create community anchored solutions. that involves a discourse with policy makers. as people of color, we need to be accountable and to be positive role models. gre
the conflicting answers. plus, 2013 will be a pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference.
it off to the mother-in-law.wing they will be sitting there six years from now and thinking what was ig thinking, what with the possibly thinking i could've gotten this house 40% less than i am paying this ye.ey'r tell your friends they are not thinking right.ree gerri: i so agree with you. the market goes up, it goes down and went down for long time, it will recover.l >> and i will sell you a house. gerri: let's sit down, have a cool places i want to look. >> thank you very much. gerri: one of the bellwether places for employee benefits. changing the way it manages 401(k) and if president obamareaks the law with what he calls recess appointments. taking a look at the new case taking a look at the new case making its way through fed [poignant music] woman: my father taught me a lot about life without ever saying a word. when i was a little girl, my friends were all just like me. his never were. - hello, hello. - didn't you bring them, george? - i thought you were going to. - no, no. i brought them last time. - you are right. [laughs] i forgot! all right, all right. woman: i used to wond
-12 in. around lake tahoe. heavy snowfall expected tire chain laws will be in effect. proportions of ukiah and to the north bay locations. it will eventually make its way to the greater bay area. this is a fast-moving system. heavy downpours at times. if your concerned about the flooding of? there could be even toppled trees because of the saturation level of the ground. we will see their rainfall in the north bay and it will spread to protest it could be heavy. and that rainfall still having difficulty. with 6:00 a.m., you are definitely gore to want your umbrella. pleasanton, this is a chilly at 38. the highs for today you can see 50s richmond, 54 degrees. here is a look at the seven day around the bay. it is wet today so watch for those patric trees tht could impact even power lines because of the current a saturation level of the soil. >> most areas are looking decent from the east bay to san francisco the san mateo bridge is also not a problem. traffic picked up lightly but easy, no matter what direction you are going on the san mateo, or the golden gate. very light. in fact,
did for them. whoever sits in that seat, they are going to make it law. i have to go over to another agency with the housing authority. let me say one thing, city hall is out of control. we don't know who is in control. we don't know what department is doing what. board of supervisors what is going on, i'm not going to sing today but city hall is out of control and we got to file a complaint for injunction. be ready for it. >> thank you, next speaker. >> good afternoon, supervisors, my name is douglas yapp right on, ace, that's all i have to say. i'd like to thank supervisor olague for her brave and couragous act. she is setting a precedent showing that children in san francisco cannot be bullied and neither can adults. so you politicians better heed the word and you are lucky bullying isn't a federal offense yet. secondly, the reason why the situation on fillmore street is the way it is is because what has the mayor's office actively done for this community? i don't see a representative here today. now, according to the notes for this hearing there was a 3-month time perio
there, you have to enforce the law. but you have now, and i don't blame people who show up here. if we refuse to control the border and identify who you are and refuse to police ourselves refuse to do everything if you're here illegally, it's hard for me to tell you you're or taken advantage of the richest venture in the world. he seems to be saying please come and exploit me. to some extent we have to reestablish the rule of law. the only point to try to make during the debate that had a significant impact on our side in solidifying the degree to which people adopt positions that made no sense. two points. one is for not going to deport grandmother's. some of you may disagree with that, but if you look at this country as a whole, the idea behind grandmother's, the churches will protect them. their families will protect them. and they cannot pin. conservatives should not write laws that are fantasies. i didn't say i'm for people who come here illegally, but i'm prefiguring out a patch of residency to get them to pay taxes, get them to be within the law, get them to be not exploited and
, right now, the nra is on its heels, defenders of our insanely permissive gun laws are in a defensive crouch right now, and it's the time that you want to capitalize on that. it's probably the only time. you don't want to let those forces. we don't want to let my sense of complacency set back or let the forces that are standing in the way of progress on this issue allow them time to regroup and bolster their efforts that are going to exist. this is not going to be an easy thing to get done. it's not. mika, you look at what happened, how it happened. we talked about this happening in shopping malls in oregon and movie theaters in colorado. college campuses in virginia. of course, finally a first grade class in connecticut, in a state that certainly has tougher gun laws than, say, a lot of other red states. in a community that seems like it should have been so shielded from this, in a season that is supposed to be about peace. >> exactly. >> i think it underlined in so many ways why none of us, none of us are shielded from this kind of violence, unless we force our leaders to do somethi
with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really t
, enforce the laws. yes, i know. determined killers will always find a way, but we can minimize the opportunities and scale back the scope of destruction. why do we accept the need for driver's licenses or submit to the sometimes humiliating body scans at airports? because it's the law, and deep down we know we're safer for the inconvenience of the law. good laws are hard to come by. civilization, just as hard. the rough and tumble of politics makes them so. but democracy aims for a moral order as just as humanly possible, which means laws that protect the weak and not just the strong. lest we forget. >>> we've seen throughout our history what happens when politics doesn't work, when democracy breaks down. the greatest, most heartbreaking problem was the failure toll solve slavery, a failure that l led to civil war. even then, it took a last act of political courage and prowess to permanently abolish slavery with the 13th amendment to the constitution. this is the story told in the beautiful motion picture "lincoln" starring daniel day lewis and sally field. the film presents th
. >>> all marriage problems come down to one of five areas, money, sex, in-laws, communication, and children. when cay and i got married, we went five for five in the first month. and our marriage was down down down. >> pastor warren talking about something many people relate to. i work out the permutation. money, sex, communication, in-laws, and children all go down in the same month. pretty dramatic. >> a gallup poll shows the number one cause of divorce is money. during this last four or five years in economic recession, as a pastor, i have had to deal with a lot of marriages under enormous stress when either one or both are out of work. it puts additional stress on everybody. >> it really does, doesn't it? people lose their sense of purpose. they haven't got a job, for example. their sense of identity. >> we choose our identity. >> their sense of self-worth, their pride. there's nothing worse than being unemployed in terms of your pride. >> one of the things i try to teach people is that your value has nothing to do with your valuables. that your self-worth has nothing to do with your ne
, the spanish government has changed laws regarding business hours. it wants visitors to the crisis- ridden country to have more time to spend money -- 90 hours a week instead of 72. >> it should help encourage trade and create more jobs in the sector. >> but the plans are threatening the siesta. the tradition of the lengthy break to unwind and relax is being sacrificed to the demands of the market. the spanish siesta was introduced in response to extreme working conditions. during the post-war period, it was not just the afternoon heat that force people to take a break. >> a lot of people had to take on two jobs at the same time. it was the only way to divide up the day so that you rested not just at night, but also had a break during the day. >> and health-care professionals say it is still a good idea. they recommend a 20-minute midday nap. they say it makes a difference at night. than a 10% of insomnia cases are chronic, and they are usually caused by work. we over lows hour days to the point where we no longer sleep well. we do not give ourselves break, and when we need more time, we t
family. in the middle, to older folks in the middle on the left is jim's attire from his father-in-law and next to him, his wife, rio, bill manbo's mother-in-law. they were both immigrants from japan. trained as a mechanical draftsman, but did a number of different jobs and he came to the united states and ultimately took up farming in the mid-1920s in the work of the california, southeast of downtown los angeles. they had three children. on the right is the youngest child. that is eunice. she was about 16% even this photograph. on the other hand on the left is mary, who then became mary manbo. on the left is the photographer's wife, mary manbo. and then is bill and mary sun, really. also called bill, that he was called billy and the family. he came in 1940s if this is some 10 shots in 1943. is three years old touching his toy airplane. mary went to the frank wiggins school as well. she was studying to become a seamstress. she became a seamstress and it's costing design for theater come any among other jobs. and there was a third child, a boy. by 1941, cne who is not pictured in this p
. of fresh watepowder tire chain laws are probably in effect some of these conditions in the high country are some of the best they had in 10 years. richmond, also in the 50s. your kron 4 7 day around the bay heavy rainfall, stormy. >> good morning. there was an accident on the nimitz. the 880 has been cleared. around the bay area, this is a look at the bay bridge. alike.the light conditions along the bridges the golden gate is also looking just falling. there are very few cars. looking just fine. >> former president george h-w bush is spending his christmas in a houston hospital. this is despite his doctors' hopes last week that he would be released by today. his doctors have not set a discharge date because they want to make sure he continues to build up his energy. been hospitalized for about a month after getting bronchitis. nelson mandela also remains hospitalized today. president is said to be looking much better and is in good spirits. mandela has been in the hospital since december eighth. recovering from a lung infection and the removal of gall stones. south african president wif
. they want to impose law. >> it is asylum christmas for this tephra church. exactly one year ago, when people -- catholic church. exactly one year ago, a suicide bomber killed 44 people, and injured scores of others. the healing process has been slow and difficult. many people have left the community never to return for good terror that i am now talking to a man who was in church -- good. i am not talking to a man who was in church that day. >> people have tried their best, but they're still afraid. the mass was not well-attended. but there is fear. [indiscernible] it is a trust. >> thank you and so much. >> thank you very much. >> there is evidence they're having a hard time dealing with the attacks. >> south africa's president says nelson mandela is looking better after two weeks in the hospital. hundreds prayed for the recovery in a christmas mass, and the 94-year-old is said to be responding to treatment for a long infection. -- lung infection. authorities in mexico city have started an exchange program to try to reduce the level of gun- related violence. the gun crime has claimed more th
and to address shortcome information the legal system and law enforcement. >> there is no sense of law and order. unless the citizens are assured of their safety, it is not only the women, but elderly, children, everybody is vulnerable to this crime. >> according to data from the national crime records bureau, reported rape cases have risen 10% from last year. the rape put a spotlight top justice system and the government's inability to deal with the crimes. >> this trial for this case will start on january 3 with daily hearings. this is midnight eastern, 9:00 p.m. pacific. >> the top stories on al jazeera this hour. in afghanistan, a woman in a police uniform shot a u.s. advisor. the killing is thought to be first so-called insider attack by a female. a gunman in the u.s. state of new york set homes on fire and then shot and killed two fire fighters who arrived to put out the blazes. shooter, who had been convicted of killing his grandmother, then committed suicide. the u.n. and arab league's envoy to syria, brahimi, left damascus after a short meeting on monday. he met with assad and urged him
green customers we're focusing on will receive so it's compliant with the requirements of the state law. so what are we going to say when we're on your front porch? really what we're looking at here is educating folks and asking if they want participate. if they want to participate what are we going to do? we will tell them "great, you will receive opt out notifications and you don't need to take any action". if we're talk to a household that really is not interested. i'm having a hard enough time paying my bills. i really can't afford to make this choice, or i am just not interested. then we will be making sure that customer is aware of the opt out notifications they will receive. to the extent that we don't hear from them in reply of the opt out and we will go back and say "hey whrks we talked to you before you said you weren't interested and you haven't sent the opt out in. did it get lost on the kitchen counter?" just to make sure that folks that told us they're not interested follow through and how to say no thank you through the opt out card and again we don't want accid
in these financial statements if we noted any non-compliance with laws and regulations and we noted no find of non-compliance with laws and regulations. with the specific tests that we go into, we verify the compliance with the federal requirements so we know there are no exceptions. we look at the interrible controls internal controls and payroll internally and look the controls and we have noted no deficiencies in internal control. we are required to communicate to you whether we noted any difficultis in the performance of the audit or whether we noted a audit adjustments, which is the second letter in the package that you have. we noted -- we proposed no audit adjustments. management has been one step forward giving us all the financial information that we needed to complete our audit and for that we thank management staff. i would be happy to answer any questions? >> are there any questions? if not, thank you for the report and the presentation. seeing no questions, can we move to our next and last item? >> yes. item no. 8 is the approval of the minutes of november 19, 2012 meeting. >> i
the upon premises they have control. loitering is defined to stand idle about without lawful business is prohibited to any property with the licensees as depicted on the form. number five. debris shall be removed from the premises within 74 hours of the application. if the graffiti happens on a holiday they shall remove it within 72 hours of the next weekday. the exterior of the premises shall have lighting and sufficient power to illuminate and make apparent the persons on the premises. additionally the position of the lighting shall not disturb the neighboring residents. number seven. no noise audible between the area of the licensee as defined on the abc form. number eight, the interior lighting is sufficient to make easily discernible and conduct of all persons and patrons in that portion of the premises where the alcohol beverages are sold and consumed. thank you. >> no issues with the eight months of operation at this place since they have been going beyond the issues here? >> everything has been fine? >> yes. >> it's a very interesting business model. is the owner or
in the law where san francisco would be liable and 9th circuit has heard by far the majority of the cases 190, cases that is 27.4 percent of all federal cases. >> thanks. >> national population. >> thank you. >> finally. >> could you share with us your 5 and 6 briefly. >> yes, thank you, sir. >> finally, in 2010, the united nations committee on torture declared tasers including the x26 as a legitimate torture weapon and the assertion that it is less lethal is ludicrous and if you go nationwide and internationally it is designated at different levels of lethality of severity, based on the police's own stands and protocols and it was only in 1999 that it was taken out of the category of being a fear arm only on the basis of using nitrogen as opposed to gun powder. no on tasers. >> next, speaker, please? >> good afternoon, supervisors. thank you for having this hearing, we are grateful. the administrative director of a foundation, also a member of the san francisco no taser task force that is comprised of 23 people and different grassroots organizations and also the city commissioner. i am here
" is manifested through the media, and law enforcement for numbers. it was more of a community. i did not go to school and meet somebody. i lived on this block and this is where my grandmother's house was, or i was born and raised. what people may see on tv was at my front door. the killing and the dope dealing. it was right there. this was a community list of people, we just grew up together. there were no handouts and no one told us how to conduct ourselves. and tell us what to wear. someone could have a school fight, and we may be at the mall, and see the person we have a fight with. the army and navy have their bar fights. i did not see this as being a game, or a community. supporting each other, this may have been in a negative way. i did not have a stable household. many of them do not of their fathers are, where their father is dead. in their return, the block i gave up -- this is who i looked up to. he had a notorious reputation. there was the violence and in return, we had the pros and cons for that. a lot of people would mess with me because of who my father was -- to my brother wa
legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs. the stated purpose of the bill is that it would help alleviate overcrowding in state prisons and county jails, and ease pressure on california's court system and result in millions of dollars in annual savings for both state and local governments. senator mark leno who couldn't join us today as been quoted as saying, quote, there's been no evidence to suggest long prison sentences deter or limit people from abusing drugs. in fact, time behind bars and felony records often have horrible, unintended consequences for people trying to overcome addiction because they are unlikely to receive drug treatment in prison and have few job prospects and educational opportunities when they leave. this legislation will help implement public safety realignment and protect our communities by reserving prison and jail space f
because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma attached to this type of issue which in my opinion should be a public health issue. it's a public health issue for a certain segment of the community and should be a public health community issue for everybody
every day, enforcing the texting driving laws, educating or citing as it seems fit. all of our activities are aimed at bringing those numbers down and making this a safe holiday season and a safe city as we go forward. so, thank you very much. have a good day. (applause) >> thank you, chief. thank you, commander lee, for bringing the expertise and the resources we need to make the city safe. i also want to acknowledge lee melatilo our primary liaison with the police department, formerly from the police department, she also oversees sfmta enforcement, the parking and traffic control officers who are sometimes out there at the busiest intersections making sure people can get across safely. and i do want to reemphasize the point, reading that text message is not more important than your getting across the street safely. so, if there's one take away here, it's please, everybody needs to be alert of their surroundings. if you have a lot of different modes of transportation that come together in our dense little city, we need people to be alert and to pay attention. the chief mention
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